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16-Sep-2019 01:42 by 9 Comments

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"For the rich men, the clothiers, be concluded and agreed among themselves to hold and pay one price for weaving, which price is too little to sustain households upon, working day and night, holy day and week day, and many weavers are reduced to the position of servants." The Liberty of St Edmund, covering the area of West suffolk, had been the barony of the Abbot of St Edmunds up to 1539.The Liberty now came under the control of the Crown.

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The duties included returning writs to the Sheriff, apprehending and holding lawbreakers, and convening the Liberty and hundred courts.Over the next hundred years local government would replace the Abbots' Rule, but religious differences would cause bitter divisions in the country.However, the town had now lost the use of the great library of the abbey, the access to the several hospitals which the monks had run, the grammar school was closed, and the various charities and good works of the monks were suddenly gone.His father was Robert Bacon, of Drinkstone, Esquire and Sheep-reeve to the Abbey of Bury St. In 1540, some of the major local transactions carried out by the Court were as follows: In 1540 Sir Thomas Kytson was still extending his landholdings, and he bought eight of the previously monastic manors in Suffolk.These were Fornham St Martin, Fornham St Genevieve, and Fornham All Saints, Chevington, Hargrave, Risby, Sextons Manor at Westley, and Monks Hall at Santon Downham. Unlike many other rich men who became landed gentry by buying up the newly privatised monastic lands, Kytson had first put his wealth into property in Suffolk when he purchased Hengrave in 1521. Sir Thomas Kytson died at Hengrave Hall shortly after making these transactions.The poorest in society would suffer most from many of these changes.

The library of books at the abbey does not seem to have attracted much attention from collectors at the time, and M R James thought that they were mostly acquired by local Bury people.

By the 20th century the stewardship of the Liberty of St Edmund and the Bury St Edmunds liberty were both in the hands of the Marquess of Bristol.

King Henry VIII now began to convert the seized properties of the church into cash.

After about 1120 it seems to have become an hereditary post.

By 1536 the post of Steward of the Liberty had passed into the hands of Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk.

Unlike many other towns in England at this time, Bury was growing and prospering.